Is content management important to Microsoft?

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Microsoft logoMicrosoft used to have a product called Content Management Server 2002; the sole purpose of this was to be a content management system. This was followed by the popular SharePoint 2007, in which “Content Management” was reduced to only one of six pillars. With SharePoint 2010, the packaging has been changed once again and the emphasis on CMS additionally reduced to simply “Content”, which is a pillar on its own. Is it wrong to interpret this as a sign that Microsoft is attaching even less importance to content management?

There are several additional indicators of this in the marketplace:

Perhaps Oxite, Microsoft’s open source Web CMS, which was originally released back in 2008, is the future of content management at Microsoft? A recent blog by Microsoft Software Design Engineer Erik Porter on Planning for the Next Oxite Release reveals some interesting details. I asked Porter for additional details and he said Oxite did not have any funding yet, but the side-project was gaining momentum, both inside and outside Microsoft.

Content management may not be as interesting and business-critical as other areas, such as business intelligence, but to me it seems as if Microsoft is communicating clearly that content management is not a high priority, at least not in SharePoint. What’s your take?

Thanks to Mauro Cardarelli and Shawn Shell for constructive input!

Janus Boye

3 thoughts on “Is content management important to Microsoft?”

  1. Looking at the Oxite roadmaps (blogposts) and AFAIK it’s still being focused as a blogging platform thus more as a .NET based WordPress alternative than a “full” CMS (a good thing IMHO).

    Full disclosure: I’m the founder of the UMBRACO CMS project – a .NET based Web CMS which in very rare occasions could be seen as competing with Oxite (as we’re not a blogging platform I have a bit of a hard time understanding that ;-))

  2. Janus – it takes investment and commitment to get to where we are with the MOSS 2007 platform, also on the Content Management area. Another analyst organixation – Gartner – regards Microsoft with a bit more credit than you do in your analysis.

    We are the top challenger, with strong ability to execute in the WCM MQ: http://mediaproducts.gartner.com/reprints/microsoft/vol6/article12/article12.html

    And we’ve been around in the leaders quadrant in the MQ for ECM for a while: http://mediaproducts.gartner.com/reprints/microsoft/vol6/article3/article3.html

    To me, working with content – search is also important and Microsoft is regarded THE leader in Gartners MQ for Information Access Technology:
    http://mediaproducts.gartner.com/reprints/microsoft/vol6/article4/article4.html

    All these three reports shows Microsoft commitment to the overall vision in working with all sorts of content, and that Content Management, including WCM is and will continue to be important to Microsoft. I also think it’s important to remember where Microsoft comes from – and not forget Office in all this. I think that Microsoft has a slightly different approach to areas such as ECM, WCM, BI – just because we also provide a rich and reach user experience, that no other vendor can provide – yet.

    I’m really looking forward to show you, and our customers the new ECM/WCM features of SharePoint :-) It’s now 2 months until the SharePoint conference opens – where all our new stuff will be revealed.

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